Category Archives: Aphasia

Propositional versus Non-Propositional speech

Propositional speech is volitional and requires conscious mental effort in manipulating linguistic segments that have to be assembled to express meaningful ideas.  Thus, propositional speech relies on language-related neural systems of controlled and intentional information processes. Non-propositional speech (i.e. recites … Continue reading

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Wernicke’s aphasia and the Tower of Babel

In the acute phases, after stroke, patients with Wernicke’s aphasia (WA) show a deep language disturbance. Comprehension is severely impaired as all the other linguistic domains. The spontaneous verbal production is fluent but the patient’s speech is incomprehensible as words … Continue reading

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